Best answer: Is Pedialyte good for horses?

Can horses drink Pedialyte? Pedialyte falls into line with most other sports drinks and will not work well for a horse that needs an electrolyte boost since it does not provide the right amount of potassium, sodium, or chloride. The potassium levels in this drink are actually very low, even for humans.

How do I give my horse electrolytes?

You can add powdered electrolytes directly to your horse’s feed when supplementing before or after a ride — but only if you’re absolutely sure he doesn’t mind and will finish his ration. Electrolytes are also available in paste form in ready-to-use disposable dose syringes (similar to those used for wormers).

What can I give my horse for dehydration?

Adding cordial or food flavouring to water can help tempt fussy drinkers. Using soaked feeds can help aid hydration without the horse having to drink from a bucket. Adding salt or electrolyte supplements can help replace what is lost through sweating.

What kind of electrolytes can you give a horse?

There are five main electrolytes required by horses, namely: Sodium (Na⁺), Chloride (Cl⁻), Potassium (K⁺), Magnesium (Mg²⁺) and Calcium (Ca²⁺) and all play important roles within the horses’ body.

Can a horse have too much electrolytes?

It is very unusual for horses to be fed too much electrolyte, provided you stick to manufacturers’ recommendations. Signs that you are feeding too much electrolyte could include feed refusal, excessive drinking (more than four buckets per day), a very wet bed and/or loose droppings.

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Do horses need salt and electrolytes?

Salt, chemically known as sodium chloride (NaCl) is fundamental to your horse’s well-being. Even horses who are not working require a daily supply. Sweating from work, or heat and humidity increases the need. It also increases the need for other electrolytes, such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium.

Is table salt OK for horses?

All horses require salt in their diet, specifically sodium chloride (table salt). Per the National Research Council, the average 1,100 lb. horse at rest needs 25 grams of sodium chloride per day.

How do you make electrolyte water for horses?

This recipe is quite popular: 2 parts table salt, 2 parts lite salt, and 1 part crushed Tums tablets or dolomite powder (for calcium and magnesium). Your horse would get 2 ounces daily on days of hard work and heavy sweating.

How much electrolytes should you give a horse?

If a horse is sweating consistently over a long period of time AND will have access to water frequently you can give 60 grams of electrolyte every hour to two hours. If water is not available on a frequent basis give 60 grams of electrolyte when you know the horse will have access to water and can have a good drink.