Frequent question: How does Bute work on horses?

Bute binds strongly to proteins in a horse’s blood plasma and begins circulating. It works by knocking back the production of prostaglandins, a body chemical which plays an important part in the body’s inflammatory response. An area which is injured, inflamed, hot, and tender will be awash with prostaglandins.

How long can you use Bute on a horse?

The damage is clearly related to dose and duration of treatment. The official recommended dose of phenylbutazone is two to four grams per day for a 1,000-pound horse, by either the injectable or oral route. Intravenous dosage should be limited to five days, then continued dosage should be by the oral route.

What does Bute do for horses?

Phenylbutazone (Bute) is an analgesic (relieves pain) and anti-inflammatory medication, commonly used for the treatment of lameness in horses. It belongs to a group of medications known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).

How long does it take for Bute to start working on a horse?

It is generally accepted that bute in paste form will reach minimum therapeutic levels (meaning the minimum amount to start decreasing inflammation) in about an hour. What you may not realize is that the paste may not reach the maximum concentration – meaning the entire dosage absorbed in the body – for up to 18 hours.

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Why is Bute bad for horses?

Horses treated with bute, especially at high doses or for long periods of time, can develop ulcers in their stomachs or colon, kidney damage and, in some cases, bone marrow suppression, although bone marrow problems are less common.

What happens if you give a horse too much bute?

Bute toxicity can also cause ulcers or hemorrhages in the esophagus and gastrointestinal tract, diarrhea, low white blood cell count, anemia, and intestinal, kidney, and liver disease. “The kidney effects are usually clinically silent, unless you look for it with ultrasound,” Dowling says.

Can a horse get too much bute?

Four grams per 1,000 pounds a day is a huge amount, bordering on known toxic levels, but I know that there are horses out there on that because owners feel they need to use that much.” Disorders associated with bute toxicity include gastric ulcers, colic, kidney failure, diarrhea and endotoxic shock.

Can you give bute to a horse with ulcers?

Bute (phenylbutazone) is the most commonly used NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) for pain resulting from injury to the joints and feet. But while you’re relieving your horse’s pain, you may be putting him at risk of developing an ulcer.

What is the best anti-inflammatory for horses?

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most commonly used drug for pain management in horses. Examples include bute (e.g. Equipalazone), flunixin (e.g. Equinixin or Finadyne) and meloxicam (e.g. Metacam). These medications relieve pain and help in the reduction of inflammation and fever.

What can I use instead of bute?

The herbal alternative to bute is Devil’s Claw which I always use together with Meadowsweet, which compliments the properties of Devils Claw. These are very safe to use in the short to medium term but I am against using them in the long term as there are better choices.

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Does Bute help arthritis in horses?

Joint medication lasts a varying length of time depending on the horse, the severity of joint disease, and drugs used. Phenylbutazone, or ‘bute’ in layman’s terms, sold as Equipalazone, is the choice of most horse owners for reducing stiffness and pain associated with arthritic changes.

What does Bute do to humans?

In humans, phenylbutazone can induce blood disorders like aplastic anaemia, which causes the bone marrow to stop producing enough red and white blood cells and platelets. People with severe forms of the disease are at risk of life-threatening infections or bleeding.

Do you need a prescription for Bute?

Bute is a prescription drug, only to be dispensed by a licensed veterinarian. Only use this medication as directed by your veterinarian. Phenylbutazone (Bute) is the most common NSAID (non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) prescribed for horses.

Is Bute good for laminitis?

-Pain management is imperative in treatment of laminitis. Though Bute and Banamine are both still used to manage pain and inflammation in laminitic horses, Equioxx is preferred especially in chronic cases due to lack of irritation of this drug to the stomach lining.

Which is better Bute or Banamine?

Bute is usually given for musculoskeletal pain, such as lameness. Whereas Banamine is usually given for smooth muscle pain (ie: colic) or ocular discomfort (ie: corneal ulcers). Bute should only be given for a short duration of time as prolonged use can result in gastric ulcers or kidney and liver problems.